A blog by Luke Akehurst about politics, elections, and the Labour Party - With subtitles for the Hard of Left. Just for the record: all the views expressed here are entirely personal and do not necessarily represent the positions of any organisations I am a member of.

Monday, June 30, 2008

If this is union control, let's have more of it

The Guardian gives front page coverage to Labour's affiliated unions' policy demands (in return for financially rescuing the Party) in the run up to the "Warwick II" National Policy Forum meeting.

I have to say that if the Guardian has accurately reported what the unions want, then I would happily subcontract large slices of the next manifesto-writing process to them, as it all sounds both eminently reasonable and likely to win us back votes.

The Guardian says the agenda being pushed is:

"unions have deliberately decided to hold back from demanding traditional workers' rights, and are instead pushing issues which they hope will have a broad appeal with core Labour voters."
"The public services union Unison is to propose that primary school children should all get free school meals to help families and increase healthy living."
"The GMB is tabling amendments that would allow environmental workplace representatives to be created to encourage "green" workplaces"
"Unite, the largest union, is proposing that employees have better access to flexible workplace leave. At present parents with children up to the age of six may request time off if their child has an exam or a medical appointment. The unions want the age limit raised to 16."
"John Hannett, the general secretary of the shop workers' union Usdaw, said his union's priorities would be to extend "lifelong learning in the workplace, better protection for young workers, helping parents and carers to balance their home and working lives, and tackling crime including antisocial behaviour"."

Good stuff, let's have more of it.

8 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

In the same paper, Jacki Ashley calls for Gordon Brown to pack his bags and go, right now.

In the Sun, Kavanagh does likewise, notable because it is the first time the paper has come out with a GetridofGordy call.


Never mind about the unions, Gordy is the problem.

12:13 pm, June 30, 2008

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

In the same paper, Jacki Ashley calls for Gordon Brown to pack his bags and go, right now.

In the Sun, Kavanagh does likewise, notable because it is the first time the paper has come out with a GetridofGordy call.


Never mind about the unions, Gordy is the problem.

12:14 pm, June 30, 2008

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

If further concessions are granted for parents then surely similar concession such be granted for people caring for other dependants such as elderly parents.

12:49 pm, June 30, 2008

 
Anonymous tim f said...

These are great - real Labour policies which will be popular (especially with our core vote, but with others too), very difficult to argue against, reduce inequality and improve quality of life for low and middle-income earners.

I'm particularly excited about the prospect of being able to go out campaigning promising universal free school meals (even better if it includes more free school breakfasts and if the meals are healthy).

Even when we are doing badly in the polls, we still have more credibility than the Tories on family issues and on work-life balance issues - it's exactly these kinds of things we should be focussing on right now.

3:14 pm, June 30, 2008

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Yes I can see Labours core voters running back to Labour, which core voters are those then, the working poor or the middle class, of course you mean the middle England.

I will not be running back to New labour this is another sell out.

7:29 pm, June 30, 2008

 
Blogger Merseymike said...

Yes. But.

These are all good policies. But I think that brown has now become the problem. I don't say that with any pleasure - but its a fact.

The NHS stuff today is a bit tired as well. Unconvincing.

10:13 pm, June 30, 2008

 
Anonymous tim f said...

"Yes I can see Labours core voters running back to Labour, which core voters are those then, the working poor or the middle class, of course you mean the middle England."

What are you talking about anonymous?

Free school meals are really complicated to claim for - it'll be working class parents who don't currently claim or who just miss out on FSM who it'll benefit the most. What's more, it'll be kids in more deprived areas that end up eating healthier and having improved concentration as a result.

And flexible working is much more of an issue for working-class than middle-class parents - middle-class parents are more likely to do the kinds of jobs which is less likely to be shift work and where they can arrange their work around their commitments anyway.

And do you really think it's middle class people who probably went to university who lifelong learning is aimed at?

11:05 pm, June 30, 2008

 
Anonymous David Floyd said...

Yes, these policies are probably bigger vote winners than secondary picketing.

6:08 pm, July 02, 2008

 

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